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Wide Receiver Antonio Brown, Accused of Rape, Released by Patriots

Wide Receiver Antonio Brown, Accused of Rape, Released by Patriots

FOXBOROUGH – After eleven days, wide receiver Antonio Brown's tenure with the New England Patriots has come to an unceremonious end.

Brown played in one game for the Patriots before he was cut on Friday, according to ESPN's Adam Schefter. The Patriots released a statement that said it was better for the team to go in a different direction after the release was announced. As reported by ESPN sources, Brown was told by team officials not to address the rape and sexual misconduct accusations levied against him over the course of the past weeks. When he decided to intimidate his accuser via text message, the Patriots felt he went too far and officially decided to release him.

The receiver now becomes a free agent, but he seems to be favoring retirement after going on a social media rant. His situation is still currently under investigation, as well, so it remains to be seen how much football is actually in his future.

Per ESPN's Chris Mortenson, Brown is also intending to pursue legal action against the Patriots in an attempt to receive his "guaranteed money." This comes after Brown took to Twitter to fire shots at Patriots owner Robert Kraft, referencing his massage parlor scandal from earlier in 2019, and former Steelers teammate Ben Roethlisberger, remarking about the quarterback's own history of sexual misconduct. They are certainly fair points to make about both people, but Brown is mistaken in the notion that he is any better than the two of them.

Regardless, the Antonio Brown saga is now concluded in New England and, if Brown's tweets are any indication, in the sports world, as a whole. We would all be better for it.

As for the Patriots, they are now at 3-0 thanks to a jaw-droppingly stout defense that has not allowed a single touchdown all season so far as the Patriots have outscored opponents 106-17. They won yesterday against the New York Jets, 30-14, and they look unstoppable. With or without Brown. (Thank goodness it's without.)


Image via Wikimedia Commons / Jeffrey Beall