#Local Boston News
1 min read

What's Next for Public Transportation in Boston

What's Next for Public Transportation in Boston

BOSTON – The 2019 summer in Boston has been defined by four things: an underachieving Boston Red Sox team, record-breaking bouts of weather, sharks in the waters of the northern Atlantic Ocean, and severe traffic congestion throughout the city.

Governor Charlie Baker and Mayor Marty Walsh have repeatedly affirmed their commitment to reducing the unexpected delays and mechanical problems that Boston commuters have experienced with the public transportation systems.

We recently got some insight into what the proposed solutions entail, including the possibility of an express train between Boston and Providence. A National Governors Association summit was held in Boston a couple weeks ago. Joining Baker in attendance were the governors of Maryland and New Hampshire. Crucially, Gina Raimondo, the governor of Rhode Island, was also at the summit.

Both governors have said that they want to speed up commuter rail service between Boston and Providence.

Negotiations are ongoing between Massachusetts and Amtrak to bring electric trains to Boston's commuter line, rather than the current diesel trains that pepper the MBTA. Baker believes the future of the commuter line is electric trains, and the secretary of transportation in Massachusetts, Stephanie Pollack, revealed that she is in talks with Amtrak for a train that can either operate electrically or can go back and forth between electric and diesel energy.

Amtrak is also a part of the negotiations between Governor Baker and Governor Raimondo, as the two aim to bring the commuter rail to the connective points between Boston and Providence, Rhode Island. According to Raimondo, Amtrak seems to be too expensive of an option, but she is still committed to developing an express train between the two neighboring New England state capitals.

These proposed transportation plans, if actualized, would revolutionize the way we think about public transport in Boston. And it's definitely time for a change, since many residents can't afford to take public transit at current rates.


Photo by Kyle Tran on Unsplash