#Food & Drink in Boston
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Towne Stove & Spirits to Reopen As Rochambeau in the Spring

Towne Stove & Spirits to Reopen As Rochambeau in the Spring

Boston, MA - When the Prudential Center’s Towne Stove & Spirits closed in January, it was with little fanfare. Despite a successful nine-year stint and an association with local celebrity chefs Lydia Shire and Joel Portillo, Patrick Lyons's experiment in high-end comfort food seemed more than a little ambitious; a bi-level, craft-cocktail-slinging modernist design that seemed like a Vegas nightclub where the menu was only secondary. Then again, ostentatiousness is what the Lyons Group is known for, and it suits its impresario. Like a noticeably bad toupee.

“When we opened originally, we envisioned Towne as a higher check average restaurant,” Lyons told Eater. “Now we feel like the market has changed a bit. A higher ticket experience is not where we think the market is going, or what diners want.”

At the time, Lyons hinted that Towne would be undergoing a rebranding. Now, details have finally emerged. Towne’s replacement will be Rochambeau: a continental French-inspired brasserie which will presumably be more along the lines of what Lyons considers to be a more affordable ticket experience.

Rochambeau will still maintain the split-level personality of Towne, only divided between two concepts. One consisting of the main restaurant and the other being a moderately priced café serving breakfast, lunch, and afternoon snacks.

While Lyons Group operations director Leo Fonseca has indicated Rochambeau is currently reviewing executive chefs, he has shared that many of the former Towne Alumni will be involved in the rebranding.

Spearheading the renovation will be NYC-based design firm Home Studios, currently responsible for Brooklyn’s Fausto, Metta and Rebelle.

Lyons has indicated that he anticipates Rochambeau to open in April 2019—in time for the Boston Marathon.

“We are terribly excited about it and feel like it will fill a void in the marketplace. In the city in general, and the Back Bay in particular,” Lyons told Eater in January. Perhaps that void exists because Boston already lost at least four longstanding French restaurants in just three months.