#Boston Politics
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So-Called "Loose Definitions" within the ROE Act Raise Concerns Among Some in Abortion Debate

So-Called "Loose Definitions" within the ROE Act Raise Concerns Among Some in Abortion Debate

Boston, MA - Recently, the Nation has been hearing about a proposed Massachusetts bill that is making its way through the government to allow third-trimester abortions. From reporting of the Washington Examiner - thought by many to be a Conservative-leaning publication, this would mean that if the bill passes, the Commonwealth will then be joining New York in having some "loose definitions" when it comes to abortions. Conversely, supporters of the bill say it protects the rights of women in the state, ensuring that abortions are an option in any safe situation.

Currently, Massachusetts bans abortions after the 24th week of pregnancy, with an exception if the baby poses physical danger to the life of the mother. State Democrats are in support of the ROE Act (Remove Obstacles and Expand Abortion Access Act) which seeks to alter the restrictions. Let’s take a closer look.

If the bill passes through government, it will give ultimately get rid of the section in the current Massachusetts law stating that doctors are required to take all reasonable steps to preserve the life of the aborted child. Also, if the bill passes, hospital rooms where abortions take place will no longer require life-supporting equipment to be in the room. Minors will also not have to get parental consent if this goes into effect.

The ROE Act was introduced to the people and the government in January 2019. So far, there are twenty cosponsors from the Senate and one hundred cosponsors from the House, all of which are Democrats.

Melanie Israel, a research associate at the Heritage Foundation - an "American conservative think tank based in Washington, D.C.," came forward to state her opinion on the matter. According to the Washington Examiner, Israel stated that the bill is horrifying; it does not indicate what specifically gives a woman the right to terminate the pregnancy. In other words, something as significant as the child having a life-limiting condition could be reason enough to abort the child, but something as small as the child having Down Syndrome could fit the bill, too. However, the language behind the bill is not explicitly stated, giving women the right to abort a child in basic circumstances.

So far, 76% of Massachusetts has stated they support abortion after 24 weeks of pregnancy, if the child is harming the life of the mother or if the child will be born of a life-threatening illness, claims the Washington Examiner. Many planned parenthood organizations came together last month in support of this cause.