#Local Boston News
1 min read

Official Cause of RFK’s Granddaughter Saoirse Kennedy Hill Ruled to be an Overdose

Official Cause of RFK’s Granddaughter Saoirse Kennedy Hill Ruled to be an Overdose

BARNSTABLE — Approximately three months after the body of Robert F. Kennedy’s granddaughter, Saoirse Kennedy Hill, was found dead at the Kennedy family compound in Hyannis Port, officials have confirmed the 22-year-old’s death was the result of a drug overdose.

WCVB reported on Friday that toxicology testing found traces of methadone, fluoxetine, norfluoxetine, diazepam, nordiazepam and alcohol in the body of Saoirse Kennedy Hill, a death certificate reveals.

Both fluoxetine and norfluoxetine are widely prescribed as antidepressants, while diazepam and nordiazepam are sedatives that have been linked to suicidal ideation. While Hill had talked openly about her struggles with depression and her suicide attempt, there is no indication whether the overdose was intentional or accidental.

Hill was found unresponsive at the Kennedy family compound on August 1st shortly after 2:30 pm. The 22-year-old, who was scheduled to start her senior year at Boston University, was pronounced dead shortly after.

Hill was the granddaughter of the late Robert F Kennedy and human rights advocate Ethel Kennedy. Her father, Paul Hill, was one of the Guildford Four, who was falsely imprisoned on suspicion of Irish Republican Army bombings in 1974.

“Saoirse was passionately moved by the causes of human rights and women’s empowerment and found great joy in volunteer work, working alongside indigenous communities to build schools in Mexico. We will love her and miss her forever,” stated her aunt, Kerry Kennedy, in an Instagram post shortly after her death.

“A fearless adventurer, she inspired curiosity and daring in her friends,” said her uncle, Robert F Kennedy, Jr. "But her greatest gift was to find humor in everything and to give us all the gift of her laughter - and our own. The gaping hole that she leaves in our family is a wound too large to ever heal.”

Image Via Wikimedia Commons