BOSTON - The second big snow of the season has descended upon Massachusetts and it has resulted in a number of school cancellations and delays across communities. The snowfall and winter effects are not as sizable as they were during the first major snow back over Thanksgiving weekend, but they are still enough to make an impact. This is largely because, in addition to snow, the weather has been joined by freezing rain and sleet that has made driving conditions in some regions almost untenable.

The slickness of the roads is mostly found in southeastern Massachusetts, as well as in other New England states, Rhode Island and Connecticut, chief among them. While snow hit the northern and central areas, the freezing rain has taken hold in areas like Foxborough and Fall River, as shared by Boston.com.

As for the expected snowfall counts, the regions that have the most are in the northern regions of the state, including North Adams, Greenfield, Fitchburg, and Lawrence, all of which belong to counties that could see as much as six inches of snow by the end of Tuesday. As for Boston, three to four inches of snow is expected, per Masslive. On the Cape, the snow will last the longest as it continues to move eastward, but three inches seems to be the max for coastal regions. Western Massachusetts communities like Amherst and Springfield will see three to four inches of snow, as well, which is the same count for Worcester county. The lowest count is in New Bedford, which will likely see just one inch.

The brutality of the winter weather is not expected to stop here. While the last bout of snow was immediately curbed by the subsequent warm temperatures in the range of fifty degrees, this snow might not melt so quickly. An arctic blast is slated to be unleashed upon New England on Wednesday after the snow stops. Temperatures, in some regions, might dip as low as zero degrees. It's going to be cold, for sure. But on the bright side, it might preserve the snow long enough that we can have a white Christmas! That's what you do during Massachusetts winters. You look for the silver lining.

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