#Boston Sports
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Danny Ainge Suffers Mild Heart Attack on Tuesday

Danny Ainge Suffers Mild Heart Attack on Tuesday

Boston, MA– While the Boston Celtics were opening their second round playoff series against the Milwaukee Bucks in Milwaukee, hearts and spirits were heavy with the organization after the recent passing of one of the all-time Celtic greats, John Havlicek. After a bit of a scare on Tuesday night, for a moment some feared we might lose another Celtic legend when Danny Ainge suffered a heart attack. Fortunately, it looks like he'll be ok.

On Tuesday night, after the Celtics lost the second game of the series to the Bucks, their president of basketball operations, Danny Ainge, who also used to play for the organization in the 1980s, suffered a mild heart attack. Ainge was able to receive immediate medical attention and was hospitalized for his condition.

Thankfully, the cardiac arrest was only mild and the doctors expect that Ainge will make a full medical recovery and should be able to return to Boston soon. According to a tweet from Shams Charania, Ainge is expected to return home tonight and has been said to be very active today, walking around and generally feeling much better, just two days after the heart attack.

In a statement released by the Celtics organization, further updates about Ainge's condition will be provided as appropriate. Across the Celtics fandom and the NBA, there is definitely relief that he is already feeling better.

The president of operations for the Celtics since 2003, Ainge is no stranger to suffering mild heart attacks as he also endured one in 2009. Just as he was then, though, the 60-year-old is feeling optimistic and strong. Hopefully, we will be able to see him at another Celtics playoff game very soon!

Regarding the incident, former Houston Rocket and current NBA analyst for TNT, Kenny "The Jet" Smith, told TMZ that the mild heart attack for Ainge is a wake-up call to all former NBA players to continue to stay in shape and make sure to take care of themselves to avoid health complications later in life.


Image via Wikimedia Commons / Aaron Frutman