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Boston Magazine Props Up Some First World Problems

Boston Magazine Props Up Some First World Problems

Boston, MA– In the United States of America today, there are a number of contentious and controversial divides that have pitted people against one another. Racial divides, political divides, and class divides have risen to the forefront of controversies among Americans. Sometimes, these divides are best highlighted by the real estate section of our local paper. Who's buying these houses? It gets crazier when the paper highlights designer home renovations by people with more money than they know what to do with, as demonstrated by a recent piece in Boston Magazine. This is the very definition of a "first world problem."

Boston Magazine highlights one of the leading problems facing rich people; a poorly decorated natatorium! from boston

Thanks to an observation from Reddit user u/SmittenMo, we now can all learn and benefit from the trials of this poor couple who had to pay someone to redo their natatorium, which is a wealthy word for "indoor swimming pool."

In this case, a couple bought a 6,000-square-foot house in Milton, but they were dismayed at the decor of the natatorium, which was previously very gaudy, but thanks to the redo, is now 100 percent classy and not at all a conspicuous display of wealth. The blurb by Boston.com reads:

"The Problem: A husband and wife with busy lives raising three children and traveling on their yacht purchased a 6,000-square-foot Milton home with an indoor pool, but a rainbow of colors and mix of patterns kept the natatorium from being the relaxing oasis they desired."

There are two exact points of "the problem" that we need to zoom in on. For one, let's note that these people are super busy raising three entire children, a feat unheard of, while also trying to make time for traveling on their yacht. You understand how hard it must be to balance all that.

Secondly, a moment of silence for this couple's perseverance in the face of adversity. Their otherwise perfect 6,000-square-foot home was tainted by the previous owners' gaudy tastes, with tiring colors and patterns in the natatorium (remember: it means indoor swimming pool). A major renovation was an absolute necessity, which, as you can imagine, was hard to fit into their busy schedules.

Thanks Boston.com for highlighting the daily struggles of ordinary people.