BOSTON – If you are wondering why the federal courthouse in Boston was absolutely mobbed with people over the course of the weekend, beginning on Friday, then you should know that it was because one of the biggest scandals of the year was finally coming to some sort of conclusion, at least for one person involved.

Felicity Huffman, the 56-year-old actress who starred in Desperate Housewives and who received an Oscar nomination for her role in Transamerica, was in Boston on Friday to stand in front of Judge Indira Talwani and receive her sentence for her part in the college admissions scandal that rocked headlines earlier this year. (Her husband, actor William H. Macy, of Fargo fame, was also in attendance at the court.)

Back in March, Huffman was arrested, along with many others including Lori Loughlin of Full House, after being charged with two counts of fraud. It was alleged by prosecutors that Huffman had paid $15,000 to someone who was hired to take the SAT college admissions test in place of her daughter so as to improve her chances of being admitted to a high-ranking university. In the aftermath of the scandal, Huffman has been in and out of court in Boston for months, having pled guilty back in April.

A formal plea was made in May and exactly four months later, Huffman was finally sentenced by Talwani at the Boston federal court. She was ordered to serve 14 fourteen days in prison, beginning on October 25, along with one year of probation upon her release on November 8. Additionally, Huffman was ordered to serve 250 hours of community service and pay a $30,000 fine. In response to the sentence, Huffman released a statement that was obtained by Suzy Byrne of Yahoo! Entertainment, saying that she accepts the sentence.

In terms of the scope of punishment that can be levied against defendants with these charges, Huffman’s sentence was definitely on the lenient side of things. Loughlin, on the other hand, who continues to deny her charges, may not be seeing such an optimistic outcome.


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